April 21, 2014
A gorgeous graphic of Sacco and Vanzetti accompanying the March 9, 1921 New York Times article, “Are Sacco and Vanzetti Guilty?.” In case you were wondering, the New York Times was as guilty of blatant character assassination as any other capitalist press during the red scare, and flatly denied what was obvious to everyone: that the duo was being sentenced to death as punishment for being immigrants, anarchists, and Italians, and not for murder.

[via]

A gorgeous graphic of Sacco and Vanzetti accompanying the March 9, 1921 New York Times article, “Are Sacco and Vanzetti Guilty?.” In case you were wondering, the New York Times was as guilty of blatant character assassination as any other capitalist press during the red scare, and flatly denied what was obvious to everyone: that the duo was being sentenced to death as punishment for being immigrants, anarchists, and Italians, and not for murder.

[via]

April 10, 2014
"The United States Fire Service has not only a role but a need to be included in the domestic intelligence community. The fire service in gaining access to information and adding untapped sources of information/intelligence can add value to the efforts of the domestic intelligence community and in return provide value added to fire departments’ day-to-day operations."

— Joshuah Dennis in his thesis for the Naval Postgraduate School, “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Where Do We Go from Here to Bring the Fire Service into the Domestic Intelligence Community?”, available online here through the Homeland Security Digital Library.

April 8, 2014
Just before midnight on March 12th, 1928, the St. Francis Dam in San Francisquito Canyon (40 mi Northwest of Los Angeles) collapsed. The dam was only two years old, and William Mulholland himself had conducted an inspection a mere twelve hours earlier, in which he concluded that a series of new leaks were nothing to be too concerned about. Within five minutes of the breach, the resultant flood waved had already traveled a mile and a half at a height of over 120 ft, carrying enormous debris (such as a 10,000 ton concrete section of the ruined dam) with it. With over six hundred estimated fatalities, it was the second deadliest event in California history after the 1906 San Francisco Fire and Earthquake
[via]

Just before midnight on March 12th, 1928, the St. Francis Dam in San Francisquito Canyon (40 mi Northwest of Los Angeles) collapsed. The dam was only two years old, and William Mulholland himself had conducted an inspection a mere twelve hours earlier, in which he concluded that a series of new leaks were nothing to be too concerned about. Within five minutes of the breach, the resultant flood waved had already traveled a mile and a half at a height of over 120 ft, carrying enormous debris (such as a 10,000 ton concrete section of the ruined dam) with it. With over six hundred estimated fatalities, it was the second deadliest event in California history after the 1906 San Francisco Fire and Earthquake

[via]

April 3, 2014
people killed each year by police in San Francisco

lumpenfag:

2001: Two

Stelley, Idris
Smith, Randy

2002: Five

Hooper, Gregory
Tims, Richard
Ruffin, Robert
Tan, Jerry
Akbar, Jihad

2003: One

Moll, Michael

2004: Four

Dean, Paul
Boyd, Cammerin
Angulo, Carlos
Rugley, Gustavo J.

2005: Zero

2006: Four

Harrington, Michael
Ruff,…

(Source: indybay.org)

March 12, 2014
radicalarchive:

'The Movement', co-published by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), San Francisco, 1967.

radicalarchive:

'The Movement', co-published by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), San Francisco, 1967.

8:42pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z9vYXy19_JvMt
  
Filed under: Oakland SNCC SDS 1967 
March 12, 2014
"A medecyne for an hawke that has lost here courage," from The Book of St. Albans (1486).
[via]

"A medecyne for an hawke that has lost here courage," from The Book of St. Albans (1486).

[via]

March 11, 2014
Mao the Anarchist, Kind Of

I’ve been doing a small research project on anarchism in Chinese history recently, and I was surprised to learn that Mao Tse-tung briefly flirted with anarchism early in his life before embracing a reformed version of Marxism. I looked into it a bit further, and eventually found this jaw-dropping passage from his 1919 essay, “A Great Union for the Popular Masses,” which I had embarrassingly never even considered reading before:

"As to the actions which should be undertaken once we have united, there is one extremely violent party…. The leader of this party is a man named Marx who was born in Germany. There is another party more moderate than that of Marx. It does not expect rapid results, but begins by understanding the common people. Men should all have a morality of mutual aid, and they work voluntarily. As for the aristocrats and capitalists, it suffices that they repent and turn towards the good, and that they be able to work and to help people rather than harming them; it is not necessary to kill them. The ideas of this party are broader and more far-reaching. They want to unite the whole globe into a single country, unite the human race in a single family, and attain together in peace, happiness, and friendship… The leader of this party is a man named Kropotkin, who was born in Russia."

It’s all just so weird and perfect I don’t even know what to say. An early and later-abandoned distaste for political purges, the treatment of Marx and Kropotkin as rival contemporaries, the lauding of voluntary association, the odd apparent conflation of anarchism with cosmopolitan world government promotion (‘country’ may admittedly be a poor translation here). All when he was only 26.

March 10, 2014

Some of the slides from a recent leak of documents from the British intelligence agency GCHQ read like a collaboration between David Lynch and Alan Moore. The state is officially using “magic techniques and experiment” as a surveillance and social control tactic.

[via]

March 8, 2014

March 5, 2014
"The smack of California earth shall linger on the palate of your grandson."

— Robert Louis Stevenson, in The Silverado Squatters (1883)